Deflected Double Weave

Updated: Mar 5



A few years ago I drove to Arnhem in the Netherlands to spend a week at the studio of Marian Stubenitsky. Marian has a lifetime of weaving behind her and has a remarkable way of exploring and working with colour. Since then I have been an avid follower of her work and have all three of her books in my weaving library.


The most recent of her books is called "Double with a Twist" and explores the technique of Deflected Double Weave. Marian fills her books with the most marvellous photographs which show how the designs on paper finish up in real fabric. Then it is up to the individual weaver to develop the ideas from there. Colours can be changed, the width of different sections can be altered.


This is the part which usually has me procrastinating for hours. Because I work with weaving software that makes changing colours as simple as clicking a mouse, it is too easy to keep looking at the options. And of course, at the end of the day, the finished cloth NEVER looks quite as it does in the software. How can it? The software is straight lines and solid colours; the silk I use is soft and once woven changes into a cloth with drape.


In the end I decided on two warp colours, jade and chestnut. I warped enough for two scarves and then went through the same indecision for the weft colours. In the end though it was easy. I have always loved working with pink and purple and had these two colours already available. The second scarf is slightly different in both the pattern and also in that I changed the pink and used a red.


I will be experimenting some more with ideas from this book. The resulting fabric is so soft and the structure really suits the silk. Tell me what you think.



  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

For news and updates, subscribe to our newsletter today

PLEASE NOTE: We have done our best to represent all product colors accurately online, but the color calibration of computer monitors can vary considerably. These photographs are a close representation of our actual colors. Due to photographic reproduction limitations, exact color fidelity is difficult to obtain.